adrienne@2girlsconsulting.com

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2GC builds mutually beneficial relationships between companies and their audience with solid strategies to develop awareness and grow businesses. We take the guess-work out of marketing and brand development, to help your company build its client base and expand its services or product offerings. We're here to support your business's ability to focus on growth without losing momentum to branding and marketing missteps.

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Knowing When to Part Ways

04/12/2012 Adrienne N. Hester

Goodbye

Like most things in life, nothing lasts forever and that includes client relationships. Often times we know from the start the affiliation was not the best move, and as time goes on the very thought of working on the account and having to deal with the client sucks out what little joy you might have left. Below is a list of signs it's time to part ways along with suggestions on how to release a client on a positive note?

Red Flags

  1. The potential client tells you what you will do wrong during negotiations based on their past relationship with other firms.
  2. The potential client states they paid way too much and received little results from the last firm and expect you to do more for less.
  3. The client is constantly telling you and/or your team how to do your job.
  4. The client threatens to fire you before you even start.
  5. The client is rude, demeaning and always blaming you or your team when things go awry.
  6. The client expects and demands immediate attention no matter what time of day/evening, weekend, holiday, etc.
  7. The work you do for the client no longer enhances your portfolio.

How to Let Go and Move On

  1. Trust your gut. If you get an ill feeling during the consultation go with it and decline.
  2. When the cons out weigh the pros it's time to move on.
  3. Once you have met your contractual obligations abide by the dissolution timeline and send a termination letter clearly stating why you are ending the relationship without being unprofessional.
  4. To ensure good will assist with the transition and offer referrals when appropriate.
  5. Provide a final invoice stating, if any, outstanding monies owed along with final payment due and include a deadline for payment.

The values you set forth when you started your company should always outweigh the money provided by a client. Never compromise your principles and always remain professional; it is part of the reason individuals/businesses come to you in the first place. How you choose to present yourself during uncomfortable situations such as terminating a client can enhance or hinder you company's growth. Take the high road and always be a leader.